Psilocybe - ALLENII - Mycotek Inject & Forget Growkit
Psilocybe - ALLENII - Mycotek Inject & Forget Growkit
  • -15%
Psilocybe - ALLENII - Mycotek Inject & Forget...
Psilocybe - ALLENII - Mycotek Inject & Forget...

Psilocybe - ALLENII - Mycotek Inject & Forget Growkit

Contents:

1 x syringe with  Psilocybe Allenii liquid culture

1 x alcohol swab

1 x sterile substrate (1200ml) growbox

1 x unicorn grow bag

2 x paper clips

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€46.75 €55.00 -15%
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Mushroom enthusiasts and mycologists alike know the challenging adventure of identifying mushrooms in wild environments like forests or meadows. Mistakes are a common part of the process, even among experts. The world of fungi brings about lively discussions and conflicting opinions on mushroom classifications. The situation becomes even more intricate when the mushroom being identified is possibly new to science and shares resemblances with other species – a scenario epitomized by Psilocybe allenii.

Let's delve into some context: The appearance of a mushroom might hint at a new species or merely represent a variation within an existing one. Although technological advances like rapid genetic sequencing might seem like a quick fix to such disputes, it often fails to provide clear resolutions. The borders between one species and another at the genetic level are sometimes hard to delineate. Generally, a consensus among scientists, backed by sufficient evidence like visual traits and genetic indicators, marks the recognition of a species as “new.” The honor of naming this new discovery then falls on the researchers who conducted the investigation. Such was the journey of Psilocybe allenii, officially differentiated from Psilocybe cyanescens in 2012.

Historically, Psilocybe allenii has eluded even seasoned mycologists. Misattributions date back to the late '70s, with famous instances like David Aurora's 1979 book, Mushrooms Demystified, and Paul Stamets' 2005 publication, Mycelium Running. In online forums, Psilocybe allenii even acquired a nickname, “Psilocybe cyanofriscosa,” reflecting its resemblance to Psilocybe cyanescens and frequent sightings around San Francisco.

A passionate advocate for a comprehensive study of this puzzling mushroom was the renowned mycologist John Allen. A prolific writer and fervent tracker of all things fungi, Allen contributed many samples for scientific analysis. Collaborating with experts like Dr. Jan Borovička, Alan Rockefeller, and Peter Werner, a significant paper was published in 2012, officially naming the species Psilocybe allenii in acknowledgment of Allen’s relentless efforts.

The visual likeness between Psilocybe allenii and Psilocybe cyanescens is striking. Both species possess caramel-brown caps when moist, shifting to a straw-like yellow when dry. Neither sports the distinct pointed cap found in some other mushrooms. Psilocybe allenii's cap may grow a bit larger, but their overall dimensions are fairly akin.

The similarity extends to the gills of Psilocybe allenii and Psilocybe cyanescens. Their attachment to the stem, gill color, and even microscopic features often present a mirrored image. The characteristics such as fibrous white stem, specific scent, and strong bluing reaction further blur the lines between the two.

So, what sets Psilocybe allenii apart? The answer may lie in anecdotal potency reports, which suggest a resemblance to Psilocybe cyanescens. Compared to the popular Psilocybe cubensis, wood-loving species like Psilocybe allenii often exhibit higher potency. While concrete scientific data on Psilocybe allenii are scarce, factors like environmental influences can lead to varying levels of psilocybin and psilocin content.

As always, caution and patience are advised when experimenting with new strains to understand their specific potency. And with wood-loving Psilocybe species, awareness of potential risks like wood lover's paralysis is paramount. Experience the unique wonder of Psilocybe allenii with the Mycotek Inject & Forget Growkit, and partake in the ongoing exploration of this fascinating fungal frontier.

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